Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Ripped

Recently I stayed awake later than usual and watched a documentary about steroid use. It was fascinating and insightful and it convinced me that as usual we need to go by a case by case example whether the drugs are in correct use etc…my BF is convinced it needs to stay out of sports and that it taints the games. I say it changes the games and there should be a special juiced up section of the games (any) where the “roided” up athletes compete. He says no it would ruin it. I disagree. I know for one thing the same prosecutor is coming after Lance Armstrong soon and that he has the goods to ‘out” him for using steroids” and that the team he was on has stepped up and confessed. This is the guy who brought down Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens. I also have met and know people with HIV who are thriving on steroids who have changed their body composition. I think many actors are on them famous guys and gals who seem to always have booming muscles and yet when you look deeply at their physiques it’s obvious they have some help. I won’t name names but there is one actor I was looking at this morning who yet again has his shirt off who I am certain uses drugs…oh sure he works out all day and is active but I sense it doesn’t hurt to get a little help now and again. I once had a spin instructor who was female who was as ripped as a dude and I would look at her body jealous that she could manufacture that much muscle now I know better. She was juicing. In fact look around at the best bodies in the media and they are getting help. Which is my point if it were not so stigmatized we would all be told willingly who was doing what, when , instead we who lug around our never ripped carcasses have to feel like failures only to find out our prime example of fitness use drugs. It’s annoying and really frustrating and unfair. Who cares if someone wants to enhance their bodies with steroids especially if they are adults? I just want to know officially that they are doing it…I think we all deserve some disclosure

6 comments:

Rae Dawn Chong said...

Just to go further I personally am afraid to use the stuff (steroids)because it could cause cancer and it makes the body change in the area of the genitals in ways that sound horrific. So I will stick to my vitamin supplememnts.

Suzi from Ojai said...

Football player Lyle Alzado died of brain cancer because of steroid use. Not worth the risk!!

Dwane T. said...

About 12 years ago Ironman Magazine had an expose by an anonymous pro bodybuilder who talked about the amount of steroids they all used, and that everyone used them. I was devastated. I had spent thousands of dollars on protein powder, vitamins, and weights since my teams. I worked out like crazy, and still weight about 80 lbs. less than pro bodybuilders who were my height. I felt robbed.

It was a personal letter to me by one of the magazine editors that put things in perspective for me. Steroids have no place in sports. Sports are all about the progression of man’s achievement against his predecessors and one another documented over time. Barry Bonds was right, steroids wouldn’t give him any additional hand eye coordination to hit a baseball. But it would make a couple of warning track outs a year into homeruns… and thus distort history and the progression of achievement for everyone. Roger Clemons throwing 100 mph for 8 innings a game rather than 6 distorts history in terms of extra wins for his team and higher personal stats. Breaking the four minute mile was a milestone for humanity. How would we see our progression if it came out that Roger Bannister was “juicin’”.

As a medical treatment, I appreciate steroids. Without them, my son’s asthma may have killed him. But when the celebration of human competition and the progression of human achievement are determined by who has the best doctor/chemist, then steroids go from being constructive to destructive. And I haven’t even mentioned the personal physical issues… like the pro bodybuilder from the interview who, in his twenties, already knew he couldn’t have kids.

I may not look like a Hollywood actor, or even like I used to look, but I’m pretty happy with my nearly 50 year old, 135 lb. carcass that looks pretty good and works pretty well too. Natural is the way to go, personally and competitively.

Dwane T. said...

In my younger years I dreamed of being a bodybuilder. All through my late teens, twenties and thirties I worked out like crazy, spent every dime I could find on protein powder, vitamins, energy supplements and weights. After almost twenty years, when the guys I read about in the magazines who were my height (5’8”) were averaging about 220lbs., I weighed 140. I was insanely strong (in retrospect), and cut to ribbons, but I looked more like Jack LaLane than Hercules.

Then Ironman Magazine had an expose by an anonymous pro bodybuilder who talked about the amount of steroids they all used, and that everyone used them. I was devastated. It was a personal letter to me by one of the magazine editors that put things in perspective for me. Steroids have no place in sports. Sports are all about the progression of man’s achievement against his predecessors and one another documented over time. Barry Bonds was right, steroids wouldn’t give him any additional hand eye coordination to hit a baseball. But it would make a couple of warning track outs a year into homeruns… and thus distort history and the progression of achievement for everyone. Roger Clemons throwing 100 mph for 8 innings a game rather than 6 distorts history in terms of extra wins for his team and higher personal stats. Breaking the four minute mile was a milestone for humanity. How would we see our progression if it came out that Roger Bannister was “juicin’”.
As a medical treatment,

I appreciate steroids. Without them, my son’s asthma may have killed him. But when the celebration of human competition and the progression of human achievement are determined by who has the best doctor/chemist, then steroids go from being constructive to destructive. And I haven’t even mentioned the personal physical issues… like the pro bodybuilder from the interview who, in his twenties, already knew he couldn’t have kids. I may not look like a Hollywood actor, or even like I used to look, but I’m pretty happy with my nearly 50 year old, 135 lb. carcass that looks pretty good and works pretty well too. Natural is the way to go, personally and competitively.

Dwane T. said...

In my younger years I dreamed of being a bodybuilder. All through my late teens, twenties and thirties I worked out like crazy, spent every dime I could find on protein powder, vitamins, energy supplements and weights. After almost twenty years, when the guys I read about in the magazines who were my height (5’8”) were averaging about 220lbs., I weighed 140. I was insanely strong (in retrospect), and cut to ribbons, but I looked more like Jack LaLane than Hercules.

Then Ironman Magazine had an expose by an anonymous pro bodybuilder who talked about the amount of steroids they all used, and that everyone used them. I was devastated. It was a personal letter to me by one of the magazine editors that put things in perspective for me. Steroids have no place in sports. Sports are all about the progression of man’s achievement against his predecessors and one another documented over time. Barry Bonds was right, steroids wouldn’t give him any additional hand eye coordination to hit a baseball. But it would make a couple of warning track outs a year into homeruns… and thus distort history and the progression of achievement for everyone. Roger Clemons throwing 100 mph for 8 innings a game rather than 6 distorts history in terms of extra wins for his team and higher personal stats. Breaking the four minute mile was a milestone for humanity. How would we see our progression if it came out that Roger Bannister was “juicin’”.
As a medical treatment,

I appreciate steroids. Without them, my son’s asthma may have killed him. But when the celebration of human competition and the progression of human achievement are determined by who has the best doctor/chemist, then steroids go from being constructive to destructive. And I haven’t even mentioned the personal physical issues… like the pro bodybuilder from the interview who, in his twenties, already knew he couldn’t have kids. I may not look like a Hollywood actor, or even like I used to look, but I’m pretty happy with my nearly 50 year old, 135 lb. carcass that looks pretty good and works pretty well too. Natural is the way to go, personally and competitively.

Dwane T. said...

Soooooo sorry about the multiple posts. Computer issues. Feel free to delete any and all. LOL.

Followers